Dickens’s ‘A Christmas Carol’ and mentorship

Image representing 'A Christmas Carol'

Turn on the television this time of year, and you can guarantee that it won’t be long before Ebenezer Scrooge appears on the screen. He is cold natured and miserly, with no charitable bones in his body. He shuns Christmas celebrations and prefers his own company. In the story ‘A Christmas Carol’, his intransigence seems absolute – he is thoroughly mean. It becomes clear at an early stage that if Scrooge is to learn a different approach to life, it will take much effort and he will not do it alone.

As the respective ghosts visit him, they operate as catalysts for change. In many respects, they act like mentors. One exception to this is that a mentoring relationship is usually a mutual one, where both parties agree to work together in a climate of trust and respect. However, by the time the Ghost of Christmas Future arrives, Scrooge is much more willing to engage and accept guidance from his ‘mentor’.

Change is an outcome of learning. For Scrooge, nothing would change if his ‘mentors’ do not engage his emotions first of all. The Ghost of Christmas Past begins by reminding Scrooge of deep-seated, repressed emotions linked to his childhood and earlier adulthood. Scrooge tries to fight against re-connecting with the painful memories. But this re-connection seems to be essential for Scrooge to see the need for change.

Mentoring is frequently portrayed as a role most people can do, with a little help and training. The benefits of being a mentor usually outweigh any drawbacks, but there can be risks, especially when deep-seated beliefs and feelings are involved. Mentees may not always want to adapt in a certain way, or address difficult emotional issues, to make real progress. Mentors have to respect this of course, but it can get messy without clear boundaries. Mentors also can be confronted with their own difficult feelings about their past when helping someone.

If we accept that digging up the past was an essential first step in Scrooge’s learning journey, the next stage is where Scrooge learns to ‘see’ what is happening around him. He can no longer shut himself off from others, and is suddenly painfully aware of the misery for which he is partly responsible. Learning to view the present through a new lens is another step towards change. When training for professional roles, this lens can take the form of principles of practice (e.g. client confidentiality) or theoretical frameworks (e.g. social construction of ageing, or materials science). A mentor can support their mentee to understand how these lenses relate to their own situation.

At this point, Scrooge recognises the need for change and starts to find new ways of seeing the world. Now, he needs a mentor more than ever to help him overcome his inertia. The Ghost of Christmas Future achieves this by showing him what a sad, lonely death Scrooge would have if he didn’t change. Seeing into this dark future is the tipping point. With the help of the three ghosts, Scrooge is able to work out what he needs to do. In any mentoring relationship, the mentee must be able to take the guidance and decide on their own path.

Scrooge’s dramatic transformation is symbolic of the kind of outcomes mentoring can achieve. Few would be so extreme, but nevertheless A Christmas Carol provides us with a vehicle for understanding a little more about how a timely intervention can make all the difference.

 

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Author: Anthea

I enjoy writing about the intersection between people and the natural world. I also feel compelled to delve into human behaviour - philosophically and practically. With a background in further and higher education, plant science and healthcare, I like to apply my expertise in workplace learning, distance learning and e-learning. Mix it all up, and see what comes out!

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